The Fresh Taste of Crow in the Morning

Disclaimer: I am not smart. I am not well-educated, well-read, erudite or well-spoken. As much as it is an embarrassment to admit these things, I do so, so that everyone take my utterances with a large amount of salt. And whenever you read something that makes you shake your head, please refer to this paragraph.

So American held an election, and to call the results a little polarizing is like calling space a little ‘out there’.

The election of Donald Trump, and the election cycle that preceded it, brought to the surface tensions and hostilities brewing in this country for years.

As with all things polarizing, when things break one way or another, the inevitable finger pointing starts, and this was the case over the last few days. Twitter and Facebook became battlegrounds with people hurling vituperations like pitching machines gone haywire. Full disclosure: I’m guilty of being quite the asshole on Twitter, which I realize is ironic given the above sentence. Hypocrite, thy name is Wisnton.

So what’s this got to do with atheism? Everything.

The divide in the atheist community is reflective of the divide in America. As Martin Hughes over at Barrier Breaker pointed out

“We’re really starting to hate each other, which leads to us attacking each other more, which leads to the atheist movement becoming less and less about attacking religion, and more and more about whether you’re a social justice advocate or an anti-SJW in the atheist arena.”

I don’t want to get into the whole SJW vs Anti-SJW argument here, other than to say it’s one of the core issues that’s separating us as a community and as a country. I, being the non-smart person that I am, have no answers on how to fix this, and it seems we’re destined to travel on opposite paths at least for the time being.

The point is that people who advocate for a secular government are now looking to the future with a sense of dread. True, Trump isn’t an overly religious person – hell, some even speculate that he’s a non-believer. Mike Pence, however, is every bit the Christian, and rumors are that he’s going to be very influential in the Trump administration. I think this, combined with such a decisive victory, emboldened the religious right. Progressive ideas, of which secularism is one, is out of fashion in America today.

I’m a terrible soothsayer. I foresaw Clinton sweeping the country in a landslide. More than a few people said – people whom I mocked and derided – that I was wrong, way wrong. I was. Way wrong.

I don’t know if the atheist community will come together in light of this turn of events; somehow, I think not, but I’m going to try and make an effort. My goal is to be less vocal about politics and more vocal about church and state issues.

Lastly, I do hate the taste of crow, but eating it can often be good for you, I’m told.

Thanks for reading and please feel free to weigh in.

The outrage on social media

I read a post recently over at Atheist Revolution in which the author wrote of how he’d decided to stop watching cable news back in December. He noted how this decision led him to feel less angry and he wondered if limiting his intake of social media might also be a benefit to his mood and wellbeing.

This got me to thinking about how angry people seem these days.  I wondered how much of a role social media plays, if any.

The reason I ask is because I recently had a conversation at a coffee shop with the owners where we discussed the election and politics in general. And, although we disagreed on a few points, it was a pleasant conversation. I listened to what they had to say, and learned some things that I’d never considered before.

Driving home I wondered, if this conversation had taken place on Facebook or in the comments section of a website, how soon would it have devolved into name calling and blocking? Probably pretty quickly.

And it’s not just politics that get us riled up either. If you were to go onto virtually any website that allow comments, you’ll find people becoming obnoxious rather quickly regardless of the topic.
Which makes me wonder whether our true nature is one that is combative and nasty or if the relative safety and anonymity of the Internet creates an environment of intolerance to different viewpoints and opinions.

As a side note, I realize the irony of this post seeing as how Winston can be acerbic and rude on social media.

In my personal life, I’ve removed myself from Facebook because there are more posts now that look to illicit a response. I see posts about religion, politics, guns, more religion, anti Obama, etc. And I know that were I to engage any of these people, it would only be a matter of time before the gloves came off, and the block party started.

So I put it to the readers: Are we humans nothing more than anger bombs waiting to go off or has social media caused us to become more isolated and tribal?

Does social media play a role in our being less tolerant of other opinions and views?